Digital X-Rays

A Faster Easier Way to Take Xrays

With the digital method, a technician glides a small sensor around inside a patient's mouth and the images instantly pop up on a computer screen in the exam room. The digital images, which look similar to traditional X-rays, can then be enlarged and manipulated, which many dentists say gives them a better feel for what's going on inside a patient's mouth.  X-rays taken this way makes

Bitewing x-rays

Why do I need bitewing x-rays?

Bitewing x-rays are the most common x-rays in dentistry. We use them to find a variety of conditions, including:

  • Cavities between the teeth

  • Tartar on the tooth roots

  • Worn-out or broken fillings or crowns

  • Receding bone levels resulting from periodontal disease

 

What happens during the procedure?

  • First we cover you with a lead apron to protect the rest of your body while we take x-rays of your mouth. 

  • Then we place a small packet of x-ray film inside your mouth. 

  • When you bite on the tab on the side of the packet, the film is properly lined up to get a picture of your upper and lower teeth at the same time.

 

Are bitewing x-rays safe?

  • Dental x-rays use high-speed film, so the amount of radiation exposure is very low.

  • Though machines vary, bitewing x-rays add only as much radiation as you'd get in four days from natural sources such as sunlight, minerals in the soil, home appliances, and through the atmosphere from space.

  • Even if you've recently had x-ray taken of other parts of your body, bitewing x-rays don't add to the total amount of radiation in your system because x-ray radiation does not stay in the body.

  • Bitewing x-rays are a necessary part of regular dental checkups. They give us vital information that we can't get from any other source.

 

 

Complete series x-rays

Why do I need a complete series of x-rays?

A complete series of x-ray is the first step in a thorough dental examination because it gives a full view of your mouth. We use the complete series to find a variety of oral conditions, including:

  • Cavities between the teeth

  • Tartar on the tooth roots

  • Worn-out or broken fillings or crowns

  • Receding bone levels resulting from periodontal disease

  • Abscesses

 

What happens during the procedure?

  • First we cover you with a lead apron to protect the rest of your body while we take x-rays of your mouth. 

  • Then we place a small packet of x-ray film inside your mouth. 

  • When you bite on the tab on the side of the packet, the film is properly lined up to get a picture of your upper and lower teeth at the same time.

  • We repeat this process with 18 separate film packets in specific locations to thoroughly evaluate your entire mouth.

 

Is a complete series of x-rays safe?

  • Dental x-rays use high-speed film, so the amount of the radiation exposure is very low.

  • Machines vary, but a full series of x-rays adds only as much radiation as you'd get in 19 days from natural sources such as sunlight, minerals in the soil, home appliances, and through the atmosphere from space.

  • Even if you've recently had x-ray taken of other parts of your body, a full-mouth set of x-rays doesn't add to the amount of radiation in your system because x-ray radiation does not stay in the body.

  • A complete series of x-rays is an important part of a thorough dental examination. They give us vital information that we can't get from any other source.

 

 

Panographic x-rays

Why do I need panographic x-rays?

A panographic x-ray gives us a comprehensive view of your mouth, including your teeth, jawbone, jaw joint, and sinuses. It gives us valuable information about a variety of oral conditions, including:

  • Position of wisdom teeth

  • Jaw-joint problems

  • Sinus problems

  • Receding bone levels resulting from periodontal disease

  • Abscesses

 

What happens during the procedure?

  • First we cover you with a lead apron to protect the rest of your body while we take x-rays of your mouth. 

  • Then the x-ray film is positioned outside your mouth, and the x-ray head rotates around you.

 

Are panographic x-rays safe?

  • Dental x-rays use high-speed film, so the amount of radiation exposure is very low.

  • Though machines vary, a panographic x-ray adds only about as much radiation as you'd get in 10 days from natural sources such as sunlight, minerals in soil, home appliances, and through the atmosphere from space.

  • Even if you've recently had x-rays taken of other parts of your body, a panographic x-ray doesn't add to the total amount of radiation in your system because x-ray radiation does not stay in the body.

  • Panographic x-rays are comfortable and safe. They give us vital information that we can't get from any other source.